Academic Policies and Procedures

Contents

Semester Hour  •   Course Numbers  •   Classification of Students  •   Classification of Student Load  •   Academic Overload  •   Grading System  •   Grade Point Average (GPA)  •   Grade Reports  •   Assignment of "I" and "X" Grades  •   Incomplete Coursework  •   Grade Re-Evaluation  •   Placement Tests  •   Advance Registration  •   Change of Program  •   Withdrawal from the University  •   Withdrawal for Military Duty  •   Auditing Courses  •   Repeated Courses  •   Class Attendance Policy  •   Conduct  •   Policy on Cheating  •   Penalties for Unsatisfactory Academic Work  •   Honors  •   Obtaining Alternative College Credit  •   Conference Courses  •   Transfer Courses  •   MMACU Enrollment Option  •   Date of Bulletin for Satisfying Degree Requirements  •   Summary Check of Degree Requirements  •   Filing for a Degree  •   Graduation  •   Requests for Transcripts  •   Student Privacy Act



Semester Hour

The Semester hour is defined as one 50-minute lecture or recitation period per week for a minimum of 16 weeks. In most cases, two to three hours of laboratory work are equivalent to one 50-minute lecture period.

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Course Numbers

System of Numbering Courses
          Courses 000-199:      primarily for freshmen.
          Courses 200-299:      primarily for sophomores.
          Courses 300-399:      primarily for juniors and seniors.
          Courses 400-499:      primarily for seniors; however those courses also listed in the Graduate
                                       Bulletin
may be taken for graduate credit by graduate students.

Upper and Lower Division Course Numbers
Courses numbered 000-299 are lower division courses. Courses numbered 300-499 are upper division courses. 400-level courses with the "G" suffix may be taken for graduate credit. Courses numbered 500-599 are graduate courses.

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Classification of Students

Freshman:        A student who has met the entrance requirements, enrolled in regular college work and/or in academic enrichment (AE) courses, and earned fewer than 30 semester credit hours.
Sophomore:        A student with 30 to 59 semester credit hours.
Junior:        A student with 60 to 89 semester credit hours.
Senior:        A student with at least 90 semester credit hours who has not been admitted to the graduate program.

Students will be reclassified each semester in accordance with the requirements stated above.

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Classification of Student Load

ClassificationFall and Spring SemestersSummer Session


Part-time                    1-11 semester hours1-5 semester hours
Full-time                    12-18 semester hours6-9 semester hours
Overload                    over 18 semester hoursover 9 semester hours

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Academic Overload

Students wishing to carry an academic overload must meet the specified cumulative grade point average guidelines and receive appropriate administrative approvals.

Fall and Spring Semesters

      19-21 semester hoursGPA-3.00, and advisor's approval in writing.
 

      Above 21 semester hours

GPA-3.00, and advisor's and college dean's approval in writing.

Summer Session

      10-12 semester hoursGPA-3.00, and advisor's approval in writing.
 
      13-16 semester hoursGPA-3.50, and advisor's and college dean's approval in writing.

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Grading System

Grades 
"A"work of exceptionally high quality;
"B"work of superior quality but somewhat lower than "A";
"C"work of medium or average quality;
"D"work of inferior quality;
"F"failing work;
"PR"(Progress-Re-enroll) indicates a student has made satisfactory progress in an academic enrichment (AE) course and must re-enroll the next semester. This has no effect on GPA. A student may receive a "PR" only once for each AE course taken. The student receiving a "PR" grade in AE 50, 51, and/or AE 90 must re-enroll in the appropriate course the following semester;
"S"work of satisfactory quality;
"U"work of unsatisfactory quality;
"I"indicates a student has maintained an average of "D" or better but has not completed a small but essential part of the regular coursework;
"X"indicates a student was absent from the final examination with the prior approval of the instructor or the dean of the college in which the course was taken;
"WP"indicates a student has officially withdrawn from the University after the last day for dropping classes and maintained passing work up to the time of withdrawal;
"WF"indicates a student has officially withdrawn from the University after the last day for dropping classes and maintained failing work up to the time of withdrawal;
"H"indicates a student has bean a "hearer" (auditor) in a course.

Note: All grades are final except "PR," "I" and "X."

Grade Points 
"A"4 grade points per semester hour
"B"3 grade points per semester hour
"C"2 grade points per semester hour
"D"1 grade points per semester hour
"F"0 grade points per semester hour
"PR"0 grade points per semester hour
"S"0 grade points per semester hour
"U"0 grade points per semester hour

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Grade Point Average (GPA)

A grade point average is the average number of grade points earned per semester hour attempted. GPA is calculated by determining the total number of grade points earned and dividing by the total number of semester hours attempted. In a cumulative GPA calculation, if a course is repeated, then (1) only the highest grade earned is included in the total grade points earned, and (2) the semester hours are counted only once in the total semester hours attempted.

Credit-by-exam (departmental and/or CLEP) and cooperative education credit are not calculated into the GPA. Transfer credit is not included in the GPA calculation, except for purposes of granting convocation and graduation honors. Courses in which a "PR," "I," and/or "X" are received are not considered in computing the GPA.

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Grade Reports

Grades are reported twice each semester: after the first 8 weeks (mid-term) and at the end of a semester. Mid-term grades are not recorded on a student's permanent record. Though a deficiency grade of "D" may be reported at mid-term for academic enrichment courses, final grades for those courses are only "A," "B," "C," "PR" (ENG 90 only) and "F."

Final grades are reported at the end of each semester and are recorded on a student's permanent record.

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Assignment of "I" and "X" Grades

A grade of "I" (Incomplete) may be assigned when, due to unusual circumstances, a student who has maintained an average of "D" or better is unable to complete a small but significant part of the coursework. In order to receive an "I," the student must contact the instructor prior to the end of the semester and request an "I," providing sound reason as to the necessity. At this time, a form is filled out indicating what the student must do to complete the course and how the completed work will be figured into the final grade. The form is signed by the student, instructor and department head and kept on file in the departmental office.

A grade of "X" may be assigned when, through unusual circumstances, a student must miss the final exam of a course. It is the student's responsibility to contact the instructor prior to the examination, provide sound reason for missing the final, and request the grade of "X." The instructor must fill out a form and attach the final exam to it. This is kept on file in the departmental office.

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Incomplete Coursework

If a student receives a grade of "I" or "X," the course must be completed and the instructor must submit the final grade to the Office of the Registrar (1) within the first four weeks of the student's next fall or spring semester of enrollment, or (2) within one calendar year from the end of the semester or summer session in which the "I" or "X" was received if the student does not re-enroll. Once an "I" or "X" grade has been submitted, it cannot be changed until the following semester.

Failure to meet the four-week or one-year deadline will automatically cause the incomplete to change to an "F." Any extension of the time limit must be approved by the dean of the college in which the course was taken. An incomplete grade that has been converted to an "F" may be reconverted to an "I" only with the dean's approval.

The student is responsible for contacting his/her instructor regarding completion of coursework. Deadlines for submission of "I" and "X" grades are listed in the Academic Calendar.

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Grade Re-Evaluation

A student who has reasons which can be substantiated to request a grade change must meet with the instructor (or the appropriate department head if the instructor is no longer on campus) and request a re-evaluation of his/her performance in the class. The instructor, upon receipt of the student's request, will review his/her records. If it is determined that a change of grade is justified, the instructor will fill out a grade change form and submit it to the department head for action. It is then forwarded to the dean. It must have dean's approval prior to being sent to the Office of Records.

If the instructor determines that a student's request for a grade change is not justified, the student may appeal. To do so, he/she must obtain a "Student Academic Complaint Policy and Procedure" form from the Office for Academic Affairs. The student must complete the form and deliver it to the instructor within 90 days following the posting of the grade. It is suggested that the form be delivered in person or by certified mail. The form specifies the action to be taken and the timeline for doing so. The form also lists the following caution: Students are urged to recognize that the filing of formal academic complaints is a serious undertaking and that the students themselves are subject to all legal codes pertaining to behavior which involves slander, libel or malicious intent.

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Placement Tests

In an effort to meet the academic needs of a diverse student population and enable students to be successful, Lincoln University uses an English ACT score and a mathematics placement test to determine a student’s readiness for college level courses.  To assist in the process, students are required to submit ACT scores to the University as a condition of admittance.

 

The English sub-score of the ACT is used to place first-time freshmen in the appropriate English class.  Students scoring 16 or greater on the ACT will be placed in ENG 101.  Students with an English sub-score of 15 or less will be placed into ENG 90/Basic English.  Students may appeal their placement into ENG 90 through a written request to take the local essay administered on the same day as the mathematics placement examination.

       

All first-time freshmen are required to take the Lincoln University Mathematics Placement Test for placement into the appropriate mathematics class.

 

Additional guidelines for placement in English and math courses include the following:

 

  1. Students admitted without an ACT/SAT score may enroll in the lowest level English course, or may postpone taking an English class until the ACT score is available.
  2. Transfer students who have not taken a college-level English course must submit an ACT/SAT score for placement in English; transfer students who have not taken college-level mathematics courses must take the Lincoln University Mathematics Placement Test.
  3. Transfer students who have taken and passed with a minimum grade of “C” a developmental English course or sequence of courses (as determined by the Lincoln faculty) at an accredited university or community college may be placed into a college level English course.
  4. Transfer students who transfer developmental coursework in mathematics will be encouraged to take the Mathematics Placement Exam.  Transfer students who have completed with a minimum grade of “C” a developmental course equivalent to MAT 50/Basic Mathematics or MAT 51/Basic Algebra at an accredited university or community college may be placed in MAT 51/Basic Algebra or MAT 111/Intermediate Algebra.
  5. Visiting students who wish to enroll in English and/or math courses are not required to submit ACT scores or take placement tests.

 

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Advanced Registration

Several weeks before the close of each semester, a period will be set aside for currently enrolled students to register for the next semester. Detailed instructions are published prior to the Advance Registration period. Students enrolled in academic enrichment (AE) courses are advised to confer with the instructors of those courses about the advisability of advance registering. Students must complete AE courses with a minimum grade of "C" before enrolling in the next higher level course.

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Change of Major Program

The student must complete all of the following steps for change of major program:

  1. Obtain "Change of Program Form" from the Records Office;
  2. Obtain current advisor's signature on form;
  3. Obtain the signature of new advisor and department head; 
  4. Return from to Records Office. 

Change of Schedule

Any change of schedule, whether adding a course, dropping a course or changing course sections, must be made within the period stipulated in the Academic Calendar. Students can add class(es) through the Web Advisor until the last day yo register for classes and can drop class(es). Students should refe to dates as indicated in the Academic Calendar.

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Withdrawal from the University

A student may withdraw from the University at any time before the last week of classes. The last day to withdraw is indicated in the Academic Calendar. A withdrawal is not official until filed with the Office of the Registrar. Failure to withdraw properly will result in an automatic "F" grade in the courses affected (see Academic Calendar for dates).

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Withdrawal for Military Duty

A person who, in a special situation, is called to active duty in any branch of the military services of the United States while enrolled as a student of Lincoln University will be released from his/her academic responsibilities without penalty. The following options are available:

  1. A student called to active duty may request to withdraw from all classes and receive a full refund of incidental fees/tuition paid for class enrollment. The refund of fees paid for residential living (room and board) will be prorated.
    Note: This transaction must be initiated in the Office of the Registrar.
  2. A student called to active duty who has completed at least 85 percent of the time designated for a course may initiate a request, through the instructor of record, the he/she be permitted either to receive an "I" grade in the course or to take an early final examination and receive a final grade.
    Note: This transaction should be properly noted (to include signatures of both the student and instructor, if at all possible) with a copy of the agreement placed on file in the following offices: Department Head, College Dean, and Vice President for Academic Affairs.

No modifications in any of the policy options will be permitted. Once a student notifies the designated University representative of his/her decision, the action selected will be considered final.

Note: Any property, i.e., equipment, instruments, books, belonging to the University that the student has in his/her possession should be returned to the lending source prior to separation.

The approved "I" grade(s) received by a student called to active military duty before the official close of the academic semester shall be maintained as a part of her/his academic record until such time as he/she re-enrolls in school. Upon re-enrollment, the student shall be given up to two full semesters to satisfy the requirements of the course(s) that were left unmet at the time of his/her departure from the University.

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Auditing Courses

A student may register to audit any course upon approval of the instructor. An auditor (hearer) will not be held responsible for assignments or examinations; however, he/she is expected to attend class on a regular basis. The student's transcript will carry a grade of "H." No credit is received for auditing a course.

A student may not change from "hearer" to "credit" after the last day to enroll in courses for credit. However, he/she may change from "credit" after the last day to enroll in courses for credit. However, he/she may change from "credit" to "hearer" before the last day for dropping courses.

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Repeated Courses

A student may repeat for a higher grade any course in which a "D" or "F" was earned, and must repeat a course in which a "PR" was earned. Only the highest grade earned will count in the GPA. A course in which a "B" or "C" is earned may not be retaken in order to achieve a higher grade. If a course is repeated, all grades obtained in that course remain in the student's transcript.

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Class Attendance Policy

An excused absence from class is determined by the instructor of record in consultation with the student involved. Should there be a case where instructor-student agreement cannot be reached, the request for an excuse may be appealed to the head of the department in which the course is offered (with the final appeal being made to the dean of the college). The ruling of the dean will be the final decision.

Class attendance is compulsory for courses numbered 199 and below. Class attendance is also compulsory for freshmen, veterans, international students, students on academic probation, and students receiving federal financial aid, without regard to the number of the course. Any student for whom attendance is compulsory may, at the discretion of the instructor, be penalized for failure to attend class. Any instructor who exercises the option of lowering a grade as a penalty for failure to attend classes must announce the policy in writing at the beginning of the semester and must follow the standards outlined below:

 

  1. For a 1-hour course, the student may have one hour of unexcused absence without penalty. For every hour of unexcused absence beyond one, the students final grade may be lowered one letter.
  2. For a 2-hour course, the student may have two hours of unexcused absence without penalty. For every two hours of unexcused absence beyond the two, the students final grade may be lowered one letter.
  3. For a 3-hour course, the student may have three hours of unexcused absence without penalty. For every three hours of unexcused absence beyond the three, the students final grade may be lowered one letter.
  4. For a 4-hour course, the student may have four hours of unexcused absence without penalty. For every four hours of unexcused absence beyond the four, the students final grade may be lowered one letter.
  5. For a 5-hour course, the student may have five hours of unexcused absence without penalty. For every five hours of unexcused absence beyond the five, the students final grade may be lowered one letter.

An excused absence does not relieve a student of the responsibility for the class work missed. A student must realize that excessive absences, even up to the number allowed without penalty, cause him/her to miss essential elements of the course. The instructor is not obligated to allow the student to make up work or tests or to repeat instructions for a student whose absence has not officially been excused. The instructor is obligated to allow the student with an excused absence to make up, as much as possible, the work missed.

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Conduct

A student is held fully responsible for any breach of generally recognized rules of good conduct. Any student whose character or conduct is deemed harmful to the best interests of the University is subject to dismissal at any time from any course, or from the University, irrespective of academic record.

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Policy on Cheating

Definition

Cheating shall be defined as a student’s unauthorized use of any materials, aids, information or assistance in doing any work required as part of a course.

  • Any student guilty of cheating will be reported in writing to:
    • The department head and the dean of the college of the course involved;
    • The department head and the dean of the college in the student’s major.
  • Any student found guilty of cheating may receive, at the discretion of the instructor, a failing grade in the course.
  • Disciplinary action for cheating may include:
    • suspension for one or more semesters;
    • exclusion from selected programs of study;
    • permanent expulsion from the University.
  • Procedures for implementing Policies 1 and 3 (when action is recommended) shall be the responsibility of the appropriate academic unit.
All students accused of cheating have the right of appeal through normal channels.

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Penalties for Unsatisfactory Work

Students who are placed in pre-college-level courses will be required to adhere to specific participatory guidelines (required class attendance, extended class meetings, counseling/mentor sessions, etc.).

The academic performance of all students will be monitored closely through their articulation at the University. The following guidelines and stipulations will be applied:

First-time Students

A first-time freshman or transfer student whose mid-term grades appear to be below a 2.0 GPA will be sent a letter of warning to indicate that he/she will be placed on academic probation at the end of the semester if an overall GOA of 2.0 or higher is not achieved. The student will be encouraged to meet with his/her advisor and to attend tutorial sessions and/or survival skills workshops for the remainder of the semester.

A student whose cumulative GPA falls below a 2.0 at the end of the first semester of study will be sent a notification letter which informs him/her of having been placed on academic probation. Course enrollment will be limited to no more than 13 credit hours during the probationary semester.

Special academic advisement and counseling sessions will be made available to the student on probation, and he/she will be encouraged to repeat those courses in which failures may have occurred. Also, the student will be apprised of the impact which failing to make satisfactory progress can have on financial aid eligibility and his/her status as a student in good standing.

A student placed on academic probation after one semester of study must either raise his cumulative GPA to at least a 2.0 by the end of the probationary semester or earn at least a 2.5 GPA in that same semester.

Should this standard not be met, the student will be sent a notification letter indicating that he/she has been suspended from the University because of poor academic standing.

First-time freshmen and transfer students entering the University in the Student Success Program will have only one semester to achieve a GPA of 2.0 or higher.  If a student is unable to meet this requirement, he/she will be suspended after the first semester.

 

Any student who immediately appeals an action of first suspension may request that consideration be given to permit his/her return under one of the following conditions:

 

    1. Definitive documentation is presented to show that some unique situation occurred which may have made academic failure in the most recent semester likely;
    2. Definitive documentation is presented to show that significant and continuous academic progress has been made in each semester of academic vulnerability.

Appeals (including materials) for reinstatement after a student has been temporarily or permanently suspended for academic reasons must be received in the office of the Chair of the Academic Routine Committee no later than 5:00 p.m. on the Friday before regular registration.

 

If a student is successful in his/her appeal of the suspension, continued enrollment will be permitted in a status of academic probation.  In this situation the student will be limited to no more than 13 credit hours and will be required to earn a minimum of a 2.5 GPA during the semester in which he/she returns.

Any student who incurs a second suspension will be
permanently dropped from the University

 

Continuing Students

Any student having attended the University for more than two semesters and whose cumulative academic average falls below 2.0 shall be placed on academic probation and will be limited to enrolling in no more than 13 credit hours.

Special academic advisement and counseling sessions will be made available to the student on probation and he/she will be encouraged to repeat those courses in which failures may have occurred. Also, the student will be apprised of the impact which failing to make satisfactory progress can have on financial aid eligibility and his/her status as a student in good standing.

Any student placed on academic probation must either raise his/her cumulative GPA to a minimum of 2.0 by the end of the probationary semester or earn at least a 2.5 GPA in that same semester. Failure to achieve this requirement will result in suspension from the University because of poor academic standing.

Any student who immediately appeals an action of first suspension may request that consideration be given to permit his/her return under one of the following conditions:

 

  1. Definitive documentation is presented to show that some unique situation occurred which may have made academic failure in the most recent semester likely;
  2. Definitive documentation is presented to show that significant and continuous academic progress has been made in each semester of academic vulnerability.

If a student is successful in his/her appeal of the suspension, continued enrollment will be permitted in a status of academic probation. In this situation the student will be limited to no more than 13 credit hours and will be required to earn a minimum of a 2.5 GPA during the semester in which he/she returns.

Any student who is readmitted to the University after academic suspension will be permitted to return but in a status of academic probation and will be governed by the stipulations which apply to persons in that category, i.e., limited to enrollment in no more than 13 credit hours and will be required to earn at least a 2.5 GPA or improve his/her overall GPA to 2.0. Any student who incurs a second suspension will be permanently dropped from the University.

Courses taken during the summer session will be treated in the same manner as those taken during the fall and spring semesters. Students may be added to or removed from academic probation/suspension for one semester status and permanently dropped status depending upon their cumulative GPA. Students on academic probation or dropped for one semester will not be permitted to enroll in Intersession courses. Students who take Intersession courses may be placed on academic probation/suspension for one semester, or permanently dropped depending on their cumulative GPA.

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Honors

The Dean's List is compiled at the close of each semester. It includes all full-time students earning a grade point average of 3.00 or above, excluding grades in those courses which do not carry credit toward graduation. A student who receives a grade of "I," "X," or "PR" will not be considered for the Dean's List for that term.

Graduation with honors falls into three categories:
          Summa Cum Laude is awarded for a cumulative GPA of 3.8 to 4.0;
          Magna Cum Laude is awarded for a cumulative GPA of 3.6 to 3.79;
          Cum Laude is awarded for a cumulative GPA of 3.2 to 3.59;

To be eligible to graduate with honors, a student must complete at least the last 60 hours in residence at Lincoln University.

All academic coursework from other colleges and universities bearing the letter grade designations of "A," "B," "C," "D," or "F" shall be included in the computation of the student's official grade point average for the purpose of granting convocation and graduation honors. Those courses which do not carry credit toward graduation at the institution where they were taken shall not count toward academic honors at Lincoln University.

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Obtaining Alternative College Credit

A student at Lincoln University may obtain credit through several means other than the traditional classroom/semester format. Approved methods of obtaining alternative credit are as follows: 1) departmental credit-by-examination; 2) the College Level Examination Program (CLEP); 3) the Cooperative Education Program; 4) the Advanced Placement Program; 5) dual credit courses; and 6) experimental learning. The combined total number of credit-by-examination hours cannot exceed 30. The following standards will be observed:

 

  1. A student may receive credit only for courses numbered 100-299;
  2. A passing grade shall be equivalent to a "C" or better. However, if the student earns a passing grade, then the credit only and not the grade is recorded on the transcript. A failing grade is not recorded;
  3. Each examination may only be taken once;
  4. A student will not be permitted to sit for a credit-by-examination assessment if any one of the following conditions prevail:
    1. The student has previously earned a "D" or "F" grade in the course;
    2. The student is currently enrolled in the course; or
    3. It is within 30 calendar days of the student's expected date of graduation.

Departmental Credit-by-Examination

A student may take departmental examinations at the discretion of the individual departments.  Guidelines listed above apply.  The student should contact the department head to request permission to take an examination.  A maximum of 20 hours may be earned in this manner as long as it does not exceed the total 30 hours for alternative credits.  The student must be currently enrolled during the semester in which he/she elects to take the exam.  The nursing program is granted an exception related to enrollment.  Please contact the Department of Nursing Science regarding its procedure.

CLEP

The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) is a national program that offers the opportunity to obtain college credit through examination. Each participating institution determines which CLEP tests will be given and the amount of credits to be rewarded. Lincoln University will accept a maximum of 30 semester hours through CLEP. Guidelines listed above apply.

The CLEP examinations at Lincoln University are administered through Counseling and Career Services. The student should consult this office for additional information concerning CLEP examinations.

Note:

To obtain credit for knowledge of the Missouri Constitution as required by state law, a student taking the CLEP examination in U.S. history must, in addition, take a locally administered examination on the state constitution.

Cooperative Education Program

Lincoln University, through the Cooperative Education Program, offers credit for internship (CEP 299). A student may obtain a maximum of 6 hours credit per semester and 3 hours per summer session, not to exceed a total of 15 hours of credit. All credit will be granted below the 300 level and will be elective credit unless otherwise approved in advance by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

A student selected to participate in the program must meet the following requirements:

 

  1. Have completed the sophomore year;
  2. Have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0;
  3. Be recommended by his/her advisor and/or department head; and
  4. Receive the approval of the director of the Cooperative Education Program.

Fees for this program will be paid at the regular semester-hour rate. The student should contact the office of Counseling and Career Services for further information.

Advanced Placement Program

High school students displaying high ability in certain subject areas may be eligible for advanced placement and/or academic credit through the Advanced Placement Program (APP). Students who score a 3 or higher on a 5-point scale on any of the examinations are given credit for having completed the comparable college subject requirement. High school students may start early on a college curriculum by taking APP courses in English, foreign languages, music, art, the natural sciences, mathematics, and history. Specific information is available from the Office of Counseling and Career Services (304 Founders Hall) and from the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences (319 Founders Hall).

Dual Credit Courses

Lincoln University provides a "dual credit courses" option as an opportunity for the highly motivated student to obtain college-level credit for courses taken while still enrolled in high school. A high school student who desires to enroll for dual credit (both high school and college) may do so in one of two ways. In the first instance, the student may enroll and attend classes on a college campus and arrange to receive high school credit in addition to the credit earned at the college. In the second instance, the student may enroll in a high school course which will be taught at a level comparable to that at which college instruction is provided. The student will earn both high school and college credit. The high school site will be the location of the instructional activity.

The following eligibility restrictions apply:

 

  1. Enrollment in a dual-credit course is restricted to high school juniors or seniors who have a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) or the equivalent and are recommended by their high school principal or counselor.  An exception is made for freshmen and sophomores who meet these requirements and score at the 90th percentile or above on the ACT or SAT.
  2. A student seeking to enroll for dual credit must be admitted to the University and must meet the academic prerequisites which both the high school and the University require; and
  3. A student who wishes to obtain dual credit in an approved course which is of year-long high school duration must have received a grade of "B" in the first semester of the course to be eligible to enroll for dual credit during the second semester of the course.

For further information, contact the Division of Continuing Education and Evening/Weekend Instruction (114 Martin Luther King Hall).

Experiential Learning

Students admitted into the Bachelor of Liberal Studies program may petition for credit for prior learning experiences. See Bachelor of Liberal Studies under the College of General Studies section for further information.

Advanced Placement and Credit in Foreign Language

Students who have completed one or more years of foreign language study in high school may be eligible for advanced placement into FRE or SPA 102, 203 or 204 and for academic credit for the prerequisite course or courses.  Students must apply to the Department of Humanities, Fine Arts and Journalism prior to registration for advanced placement.  Local placement tests will be administered by the foreign language faculty.  Students who place into FRE or SPA 102, 203 or 204 may receive full credit for the prerequisite course or courses provided that they pass the course in which they enroll with a grade of “C” or better.  For details and application deadlines, contact the Department of Humanities, Fine Arts and Journalism.

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Conference Courses

 

  1. A conference course is defined as an independent program of study for a 300- or 400-level course listed in the Lincoln University Undergraduate Bulletin, provided that such a course is not offered during the semester in question.
  2. The following guidelines apply:
    1. The student must have accumulated 90 degree credit hours or more, and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00;
    2. A student may not register in a course in which he/she previously received a grade;
    3. Prior to registering for a conference course, a student must have the approval of the following:
      1. the student's academic advisor;
      2. the instructor with whom the student will be taking independent study;
      3. the department head of the student's major area;
      4. the department head of the area in which the course is offered; and
      5. the dean of the college in which the course is offered;
    4. A student must register for a conference at the regular time provided for University general registration;
    5. The maximum number of conference courses during any one semester for any student shall not be more than two courses and not exceed 8 credit hours.

A student enrolling in a conference course must follow prescribed procedures (available in the Office of Records). The registration form must be filed with the Office of the Registrar at least two weeks prior to the first day of registration.

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Transfer Courses

A student enrolled at Lincoln University desiring to earn credits at another institution of higher education as a University student and have those credits applied toward a degree at Lincoln University must seek the written approval of the Director of Admissions and Records and other appropriate University officials.  Approval must be obtained prior to taking the particular course(s).  The form (Certification of Transfer Credits) may be obtained from the Office of Records.  A student receiving such approval must have official transcripts submitted to the Office of Records immediately upon completion of the course(s).

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MMACU Enrollment Option

An agreement among the six member institutions of the Mid-Missouri Associated Colleges and Universities (MMACU) permits Lincoln University students to enroll in courses offered at the University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia College, Stephens College, Westminster College and William Woods College. This policy is designed to accommodate the student who wishes to take advantage of a course or courses which are not offered at Lincoln University in the current semester. Requests for exchange enrollment must be planned in advance and arranged through the Office of Records.

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Date of Bulletin for Satisfying Degree Requirements

The Lincoln University Undergraduate Bulletin contains the academic regulations and degree requirements of the University. A student may choose to satisfy these requirements for graduation from any one Bulletin issued in the eight years prior to the awarding of a bachelor's degree or the three years prior to the awarding of an associate degree, provided that he/she was enrolled during the academic year for which that Bulletin was issued. Students must meet general education requirements in effect upon first enrollment; they must meet major and minor requirements in effect at the time the major or minor is declared.

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Summary Check of Degree Requirements

The student is responsible for consulting periodically throughout his/her academic career with a departmental advisor to verify that he/she is meeting both general education and degree requirements.

After completing at least 70 credit hours, a student should apply for a summary check at the Office of Records. The summary check verifies the general education requirements that the student had completed.

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Filing for a Degree

A student should file for graduation with the Office of Records no later than the start of the semester in which he/she will graduate. A student must file on or before the last day to file for degrees for the semester in which the degree is to be received, in accordance with the deadline date listed in the Academic Calendar. A student filing after this deadline will not be able to receive the degree certificate until the next graduation period.

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Graduation

A student may complete graduation requirements at the close of any semester or summer session.  Formal announcement of graduation is made and degrees are conferred at the close of the fall and spring semesters.  A student completing graduation requirements is expected to participate in commencement activities unless excused in writing by the Office for the Vice President for Academic Affairs at least three weeks prior to Commencement.  Only students who have fulfilled all requirements for graduation will be allowed to participate in commencement exercises.

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Requests for Transcripts

A student may request his/her transcript at any time by completing a Request for Transcript form at the Office of Records.  Only the student whose name appears on the transcript may request it.  Federal law requires that every request for a transcript be in writing.  A transcript will be issued if the student's financial accounts are paid.

A transcript may also be requested by letter. The letter should include the following:

 

  1. Full name under which the student was last enrolled and any other names previously used by the student;
  2. Current address;
  3. Other identifying information such as birth date, degrees earned and dates, and student ID (social security) number;
  4. The name and address of the recipient of the transcript;
  5. The transcript fee of $3.
  6. Signature

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Student Privacy Act

In accordance with the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, Lincoln University has developed the following statements in regard to access to student records:

  1. Public Records (Directory Information)
    • "Directory Information" includes the following information relating to a student: the student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized  activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student and other similar information.
    • A student shall be informed at the time of admission that such records may be released unless it is specifically requested in writing by the last day of registration that all or part of the information shall not be disclosed as a matter of public record.
  2. Confidential Records
    • The University will not send or release grade reports, transcripts, attendance data, identifying data, or other educational information in the student file intended for school use without the written consent of the student. Upon receipt of a signed authorization from the student, appropriate material may be released in accordance with his/her request.
    • Exempted from this restriction are the parents of a dependent student as defined by the Internal Revenue Code, i.e., a student who receives over one-half of his/her financial support from the natural or adoptive parent(s).

The complete statement of the University's policy, with regard to this act, may be found in the Rules and Regulations of Lincoln University.

 

The complete Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 is available for review upon request in the Office of Records.

 

Student Right-To-Know and Campus Security Act

In compliance with the Student Right-To-Know and Campus Security Act, it is the policy of Lincoln University to make readily available information regarding Lincoln University’s graduation rates and crime statistics. This information is available in the Office of Records upon request.

 

Current campus law enforcement policies and campus security statistics are available upon request from the Director of Public Safety, Lincoln University, 820 Chestnut Street, Jefferson City, MO 65102, (573) 681-5555.  The Lincoln University Campus Security and Crime Statistics Report is also available for viewing at the Lincoln Public Safety Site.

 

 

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Student Complaint Procedure